Thursday, 21 May 2015

Fly Like the Eagle - Nature of Abstract Art



Oilpainting by Jane Monica Tvedt


The Eagle

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.


From my artjournal -  I sometimes ask myeself;  why do I go from painting naturalist into more and more abstract. I have not got any good answer. I just follow my intuition.  Abstract art could maybe lead me back to more naturalistic painting.......who knows ;)


When an eagle appears, you are on notice to be courageous and stretch your limits. Do not accept the status quo, but rather reach higher and become more than you believe you are capable of. Look at things from a new, higher perspective. Be patient with the present; know that the future holds possibilities that you may not yet be able to see. You are about to take flight.


History

The Native Indians saw the Eagle as a symbol for great strength, leadership and vision. As if to seemingly mirror this, the eagle has been used as a 'banner' by many of the great empires throughout history, from Babylon to Egypt, through to Rome and even the United States. In early Christianity the eagle was seen as a symbol of hope and strength, representing salvation. The eagle appears twice in the book of Revelation; both times in a context that suggests it is on the side of God. In Islam, the eagle represents warlike ferocity, nobility and dominion. 


We aren't just eyes; we have memories, feelings. Emotional content is what makes life whole, and a lot of abstraction has no connection with people... (Mark Adams)

Nature of Abstract Art

Before there was an art of abstract painting, it was already widely believed that the value of a picture was a matter of colors and shapes alone. Music and architecture were constantly held up to painters as examples of a pure art which did not have to imitate objects but derived its effects from elements peculiar to itself. But such ideas could not be readily accepted, since no one had yet seen a painting made up of colors and shapes, representing nothing. If pictures of the objects around us were often judged according to qualities of form alone, it was obvious that in doing so one was distorting or reducing the pictures; you could not arrive at these paintings simply by manipulating forms. And in so far as the objects to which these forms belonged were often particular individuals and places, real or mythical figures, bearing the evident marks of a time, the pretension that art was above history through the creative energy or personality of the artist was not entirely clear. In abstract art, however, the pretended autonomy and absoluteness of the aesthetic emerged in a concrete form. Here, finally, was an art of painting in which only aesthetic elements seem to be present. 

Abstraction is real, probably more real than nature. I prefer to see with closed eyes. (Josef Albers)



Painting is a duality and abstract painting is an entirely aesthetic thing. It always remains on one level. It is only really interesting in the beauty of its patterns or its shapes. (Francis Bacon)


The more horrifying the world becomes, 
the more art becomes abstract. (Paul Klee)




Nå har jeg registrert meg på Bloggurat. Jeg har plassert min blogg i Sandnesnorske bloggkart!

No comments: